About maureenkday

Dr. Maureen Day is the Assistant Professor of Religion and Society at the Franciscan School of Theology and Research Fellow at the Center for Church Management at Villanova University. Committed to young adult ministry, Maureen Day is a member of the Alliance for Campus Ministry, an advisory group to the USCCB’s Secretariat on Catholic Education. Her writings on American Catholic life appear in both Catholic and academic publications, including an edited collection on vocational discernment among young adult Catholics (Paulist Press) as well as a forthcoming book on American Catholic civic engagement (NYU Press). She is currently researching pastoral approaches among Catholic campus ministers (co-funded by the USCCB and the Religious Research Association) and financial stewardship among Latino Catholics (funded by Villanova University's Center for Church Management). She has provided her expertise on families and young adults to the Church at both the diocesan and national level, recently co-authoring the report for the USCCB’s 2017 National Study of Catholic Campus Ministry.

Weekend with the USCCB

IMG_3048I just got back from Baltimore late last night and had a very good session with the bishops and some observers (including Dr. Michael Galligan-Stierle, president of the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities). Dr. Brian Starks, Hans Plate (Vinea Research) and I presented on the findings from the recent campus ministry survey. I was very happy to see so many interested in this important young adult ministry.

To celebrate, we shared bread, wine and more at a local restaurant. Pictured above are Crystal Sullivan (University of Dayton), Hilary Draftz (FOCUS), Mary Deeley (Northwestern University), Brian, Bishop Cheri (New Orleans), Barbara McCrabb (USCCB), Hans, Rosie Chinea-Shawver (University of Southern California) and me.

Book Review for Young Adult American Catholics

1I’m very grateful to Dan Morris-Young of the National Catholic Reporter for the thoughtful and positive review he gave of my Young Adult American Catholics. He concludes his review by noting some of the most relevant audiences for the book, writing:

The book could be a valuable tool on many fronts, in addition to simply providing its reader with a panoramic sense of young adult Catholics. Parish leaders could be better-informed in the evaluation of young adult outreach. Diocesan planners could gain insight into specific challenges, such as ministry to the LGBTQ community or to young Hispanics. Lay organizations might have light bulbs come on about involving young adults in their perhaps flagging apostolates.

Please enjoy the full text of his review here and if you prefer to purchase on amazon, you may do so here.

Latino Catholics and U.S. Politics

As you are considering which candidate you’ll be casting your vote for, take a second to read “Latinos could transform faith’s role in US politics” by Maria Benevento of the National Catholic Reporter. In it she discusses her interview with me and others, helping us to better understand the significance of the Latino vote today.

If you want to know a bit more on the details of the Latino and white vote in light of the 2016 election, please see my guest post, “Understanding the Catholic Vote: White and Hispanic Catholics in 2016,” on Catholic Moral Theology.

New Role with ASR

Dr. Jim Cavendish of the University of South Florida, as President-Elect of the Association for the Sociology of Religion, just tapped me to join the membership committee. It was fun to work with Jim as Registration Coordinator when he was Executive Officer, and now I’m so pleased to continue to staff the organization in this new role. Can’t wait to see it grow!

Hope to see you in New York in 2019!

Postsecular Catholicism

1Dr. Michele Dillon of the University of New Hampshire had her Postsecular Catholicism: Relevance and Renewal come out earlier this year. I was invited to critique this at the Association for the Sociology of religion in Philadelphia this August and found it was a brilliant read. I cannot say enough good things about the book and recommend it for anyone asking serious questions about Catholicism’s impact on American society. Especially pertinent now is her chapter on the Synod on the Family; the issues she raises–particularly gender–are gaining attention at the current synod on young people, faith and vocational discernment.

I also reviewed it for America. An excerpt reads, “Dillon’s familiarity with both a postsecular landscape and her fluency in Catholic concerns and interests allow her to cogently illustrate the overlap between Catholicism and the broader social world as well as the tensions that are inherent to a postsecular Catholicism.” We’ll be reading it in my Ministering to American Catholics course later this semester; I can’t wait to hear the great discussion it will generate!

2017 Study on Catholic Campus Ministers

Campus Ministry Report CoverHappy Feast Day of Blessed John Henry Newman, patron of Catholic Campus Ministry in the United States. In honor of this, the USCCB has just released a report on the state of Catholic campus ministry in the United States. The respondents include over half of the 1,911 identified campus ministers, providing very robust findings.

I, along with principal investigator Dr. Brian Starks of Kennesaw State University, co-authored this report and we’ll be presenting the findings to the USCCB this November.

My thanks to all the ministers who participated in the survey. I also appreciate the efforts of everyone who helped look for the themes within the data and shared these with practitioners, bishops and others at the 2017 symposium at the University of Notre Dame.